2.16.2018

https://www.kijiji.ca/v-classic-cars/penticton/1980-fiat-124-spider-roadster-collector/1330667023?enableSearchNavigationFlag=true

AMC Paser

75000 miles 1976 amc as part of ford in the mid 1970's $17 000 Seattle paperwork at the boarder 72h before arrival. Allen 818 907 1770 Los Angeles


https://www.hemmings.com/classifieds/dealer/amc/pacer/2072075.html#&gid=1&pid=5

2.02.2018

suffragette 

5.14.2012

Gamers 


6.19.2011

Sleeping With the Enemy

" The task of extremist writing is to put through the call for a justice of the future. Henceforth, Justice can no longer permit itself to be merely backward looking or bound in servility to sclerotic models and their modifications ( their ' future' ). A justice of the future would have to show the will to rupture."

There seems little doubt within the contemporary American legal academies that critical legal studies represented the emergence of a left intelligentsia in law. While there are indeed few other intellectual criteria by which to demarcate either a critical movement or position within legal theory, there remains the basic common denominator of a  commitment to a radical political position both within and without the legal institution. Critical legal studies is the 'leftist' inheritor of legal realism; it is a 'political location', subversive, deviationist' and on occasion even 'nihilistic', the extremist political position of a critical movement which ironically no longer believes in critique if not abolition of the extant rule of law.

This chapter is dedicated ironically to the proposition that critical legal studies in America has failed in its radicalism: it has neither gone to the roots of the tradition, in the sense of philosophical radicalism, nor pursed any consistent commite to fundamental change, in the sense of political radicalism. It is in many respects unsurprising to obserce that the left in law hares the 'disintegrative' fate of its European counterparts, that in conditions of political seclusion and existential isolation it treads the same path as western Marxism, towards philosophical idealism focused upon questions of method applied.

5.17.2011

Cylindrical Block, Head

The following schematic shows the 2006 Volvo S60 Cylinder Head Assembly Parts Diagram. This car features: front side airbags, curtain side airbags, traction control, and ABS are standard; on selected models include a navigation system, bi-xenon headlamps, rear obstacle detection, and wood interior trim.

1. CYLINDER BLOCK
2. CYLINDER HEAD
3. HEAD GASKET
4. COVER
5. INTAKE VALVE
6. EXHAUST VALVE
7. VALVE SEATS
8. VALVE SEALS
9. VALVE SPRINGS
10. VALVE SPRING RETAINERS
11. VALVE SPRING LOCKS
12. VALVE LIFTERS
13. CAMSHAFT
14. CAMSHAFT SEAL
15. FRONT COVER
16. CAMSHAFT GEAR
17. CRANKSHAFT GEAR
18. TIMING BELT
19. TENSIONER
20. IDLER PULLEY
21. DAMPER
22. RINGS
23.
24. CONNECTING ROD
25. BEARINGS
26. BEARING SET
27. CRANKSHAFT
28. REAR MAIN SEAL
29. VIBRATION DAMPER
30. OIL PAN
31. OIL PUMP
32. OIL PICK-UP

4.19.2011


Sentences on Conceptual Art
Sol Lewitt.
First published in 0-9 (New York), 1969, and Art-Language Vol. 1, No. 1 (England), May 1969
  1. Conceptual artists are mystics rather than rationalists. They leap to conclusions that logic cannot reach.
  2. Rational judgements repeat rational judgements.
  3. Irrational judgements lead to new experience.
  4. Formal art is essentially rational.
  5. Irrational thoughts should be followed absolutely and logically.
  6. The artist changes his mind midway through the execution of the piece, he compromises the result and repeats past results.
  7. The artist’s will is secondary to the process he initiates from idea to completion. His wilfulness may only be ego.
  8. When words such as painting and sculpture are used, they connote a whole tradition and imply a consequent acceptance of this tradition, thus placing limitations on the artist who would be reluctant to make art that goes beyond the limitations.
  9. The concept and idea are different. The former implies a general direction while the latter is the component. Ideas implement the concept.
  10. Ideas can be works of art; they are in a chain of development that may eventually find some form. All ideas need not be made physical.
  11. Ideas do not necessarily proceed in logical order. They may set one off in unexpected directions, but an idea must necessarily be completed in the mind before the next one is formed.
  12. < For each work of art that becomes physical there are many variations that do not.
  13. A work of art may be understood as a conductor from the artist’s mind to the viewer’s. But it may never reach the viewer, or it may never leave the artist’s mind.
  14. The words of one artist to another may induce an idea chain, if they share the same concept.
  15. Since no form is intrinsically superior to another, the artist may use any form, from an expression of words (written or spoken) to physical reality, equally.
  16. If words are used, and they proceed from ideas about art, then they are art and not literature; numbers are not mathematics.
  17. All ideas are art if they are concerned with art and fall within the conventions of art.
  18. One usually understands the art of the past by applying the convention of the present, thus misunderstanding the art of the past.
  19. The conventions of art are altered by works of art.
  20. Successful art changes our understanding of the conventions by altering our perceptions.
  21. Perception of ideas leads to new ideas.
  22. The artist cannot imagine his art, and cannot perceive it until it is complete.
  23. The artist may misperceive (understand it differently from the artist) a work of art but still be set off in his own chain of thought by that misconstrual.
  24. Perception is subjective.
  25. The artist may not necessarily understand his own art. His perception is neither better nor worse than that of others.
  26. An artist may perceive the art of others better than his own.
  27. The concept of a work of art may involve the matter of the piece or the process in which it is made.
  28. < Once the idea of the piece is established in the artist’s mind and the final form is decided, the process is carried out blindly. There are many side effects that the artist cannot imagine. These may be used as ideas for new works.
  29. The process is mechanical and should not be tampered with. It should run its course.
  30. There are many elements involved in a work of art. The most important are the most obvious.
  31. If an artist uses the same form in a group of works, and changes the material, one would assume the artist’s concept involved the material.
  32. Banal ideas cannot be rescued by beautiful execution.
  33. It is difficult to bungle a good idea.
  34. When an artist learns his craft too well he makes slick art.
  35. These sentences comment on art, but are not art.